Travels with Paintball

IMG_20170719_093247We’ve now got about 800 miles under our wheels since we set off from Newark last Saturday morning.

Photos – uh, right. Well, we picked up a case of fog camping in the Camden Hills, and only managed to finally shake it as we pulled up in Moncton, way out at the tip of the Bay of Fundy. Fog at the top of Mount Battie, fog at Ocean Lookout. Fog in Bar Harbor and down to the tip of Acadia National Park. Fog up to the bridge at Lubec, the northeasternmost point in the United States. Not that it wasn’t pretty as all get-out, but we couldn’t see much beyond the road ahead of us until we crossed over into Canada at Campobello Island.

IMG_20170717_200526

Fog in Camden

IMG_20170718_085434

Fog on Mount Battie

IMG_20170718_095208

Fog at Ocean Overlook

IMG_9825

Fog in Acadia

IMG_9829

Oooh – pretty mushrooms!

And there was plenty of entertainment along the way: the giant blueberries (actually steel marine floats and a painted geodesic dome) of Wild Blueberryland, the Bad Little Falls of Machias and, of course, oversized fiberglass lobsters everywhere you turned.

But something changed when we crossed over that bridge into the land of cheerful and efficient civic service: the fog (perhaps, sensing that it had overstepped propriety), backed off, and as we island-hopped the adorable little ferries from Campobello to Deer Island to the New Brunswick mainland, it just slowly, undramatically, retreated into the background.

IMG_9844

Crossing into Canada

IMG_9840

IMG_9867

Cutest little ferries in the world

It was a bit of a surprise to find ourselves on the mainland, and we made a snap decision to bolt eastward, to Moncton, at the head of the Bay of Fundy. The coast of New Brunswick (motto: “Please Don’t Call Us the ‘Drive Through’ Province”) holds many wonders, but, well, uh, yeah. Sorry.

IMG_9874

Just passing through…

Devon, who’s got her own improbably Devonverse thing going these days. We decided that we were going to grab a room for the night, rather than camp, and rolled up to the place she’d picked out online. A bunch of people were gathering on the walkway overlooking the river below, and my spidey-sense flicked on: something’s about to happen!

Under the walkway a fellow on a surfboard was riding the muddy water out to sea. Oh, hey – I know what’s going on. I’d read about Moncton’s tidal bore: the river reverses with one solid wave that comes up from the bay, and this guy was gonna surf it. The reversal thing happens twice a day, but apparently, the surf thing not so often, so a lot of folks were excited to watch.

Honestly, it wasn’t a spectacular wave to surf, but damned if it didn’t just come right up the river and carry the guy out of sight. An hour later, the water had risen something like 20 feet, right up to the top of its bank.

IMG_9875

Folks watching on the bank

IMG_9877

River is pretty much empty

IMG_9878

Surfer waiting for his wave

IMG_9880

Here it comes!

IMG_9882IMG_9884IMG_9888IMG_9891IMG_9893IMG_9896

IMG_9898

And there he goes!

IMG_20170719_205427

An hour later, the river’s up to its banks

Today we’re headed for Hopewell Rocks, the iconic 40-foot tides at the tip of the Bay of Fundy, then up to Prince Edward Island to poke our noses into the whole Anne-of-Green-Gables thing. Stay tuned!

2 responses to “Travels with Paintball

  1. Hi Pablo. Alan Furth here. My friend, Jennifer Kane, directed me to your blog. I am director of the Cobscook Community Learning Center. You were in our neighborhood two weeks ago! – in the fog. A Lubec community icon, Coochie Case, wrote a song titled “The Peanut Butter Song” (about living in our community and the surplus commodities that sustained (s) folks here). As a folk singer, I thought you’d appreciate it.

    Say looky down yonder to Quoddy Head,
    see that fog bank rolling in
    I guess you know that that means, folks,
    its summer time again.

    Chorus: Hear that fog horn blowing,
    oh man, what a mournful sound
    See that fog bank rolling in,
    its covering up the town.

    I guess we’ll have to dig out our old long johns
    if we play any softball games
    ‘Cause you sure get cold standing around
    in the fog and the wind and the rain

    My kinfolk they was farmers,
    and some lived by the sea,
    But my wife shops for goodies at
    the grand old A&P
    The cost of living’s going up,
    but that don’t bother me,
    ‘Cause I been living on hand-me-downs
    and surplus commodities.

    I love that peanut butter
    it really is a treat
    It put Carter in the White House
    and Georgia on Main Street.

    Old Time Music Circle at CCLC every Monday evening except the 1st and 3rd. Stop in next time.
    My wife and I are taking our grandkids out backpacking on Grand Manan out in bold Fundy on the 20th. Be sure to take that in next time through as well.

    Check out http://www.thecclc.org
    Alan Furth

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, this is brilliant – thanks, Alan! We’ll definitely be back. Neither of us had ever been “down Maine,” and we completely fell in love with the beauty and quirky sense of community (both of which have much the same feel that drew us to the Pacific Northwest).

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s